Sacredness



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BIBLIOGRAPHY


© 1998 (text only) Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe

An exploration of how and why places become invested with SACREDNESS and how the SACRED is embodied or made manifest through ART and ARCHITECTURE


CHARTRES, FRANCE

Chartres Cathedral, begun in 1194, is the epitome of Gothic architecture. Prior to the cathedral, a Christian church had stood on the same site since the 4th century. Centuries earlier, however, on the same spot had stood an oak grove where Druids held their ceremonies.

Speculation on the origins of Gothic architecture has produced many references to the Gothic cathedral as echoing a wood with the nave, transepts and choir, with their ribbed vaults, likened to forest glades. The image is compelling, and in the 18th and 19th centuries much was written about the sylvan origins of Gothic architecture.

In 1792, Sir James Hall, using posts of ash and pliant willow rods, demonstrated to his own satisfaction the timber origins of Gothic architectural forms.

Today these ideas are generally dismissed.

Bibliography:

  • Sir James Hall, Essays on the Origins, History and Principles of Gothic Architecture, London, 1813.

  • Louis Charpentier, The Mysteries of Chartres Cathedral, translated from the French by Ronald Fraser, New York: Avon Books, 1975 (first published 1966; English translation first published 1972).


SACRED PLACES is written and produced by Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe, Professor, Department of Art History, Sweet Briar College, Virginia, 24595 USA

Lascaux
France

Giza Plateau
Egypt

Stonehenge
England

Newgrange
Ireland

Abu Simbel
Egypt

Delphi
Greece

Athenian Acropolis
Greece

Holy Sepulchre
Israel

Dome of the Rock
Israel

Chartres
France

Lourdes
France

Shrine at Ise
Japan

Bodh Gaya
India

Teotihuacán
Mexico

St. Peter's Basilica
Italy

Mecca
Saudi Arabia

Mosque of Córdoba
Spain

Kata Tjuta
Australia