Sacredness



Caves


Stones


Mountains


Trees


Water


BIBLIOGRAPHY


© 1998 (text only) Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe

An exploration of how and why places become invested with SACREDNESS and how the SACRED is embodied or made manifest through ART and ARCHITECTURE


LASCAUX

Many caves have been invested with sacredness (cf. The Sacred Cave). The earliest known example of a sacred cave is that discovered in 1940 at Lascaux in France [see a map showing the location]. Although there is much debate over the meaning of the engraved, drawn, and painted animals which decorate the walls and ceiling of the main cavern (known as the 'Hall of the Bulls') and various steep galleries and passages, their very existence in this dark interior space leaves little reason to doubt that the cave, and others like it, were considered sacred by the people who decorated them [see a plan of the cave].

The paintings were done on a light background in various shades of yellow, red, brown, and black.

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TO BE COMPLETED
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Bibliography:

  • Georges Bataille, Lascaux or the Birth of Art, Lausanne: Skira, 1955.


SACRED PLACES is written and produced by Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe, Professor, Department of Art History, Sweet Briar College, Virginia, 24595 USA

Lascaux
France

Giza Plateau
Egypt

Stonehenge
England

Newgrange
Ireland

Abu Simbel
Egypt

Delphi
Greece

Athenian Acropolis
Greece

Holy Sepulchre
Israel

Dome of the Rock
Israel

Chartres
France

Lourdes
France

Shrine at Ise
Japan

Bodh Gaya
India

Teotihuacán
Mexico

St. Peter's Basilica
Italy

Mecca
Saudi Arabia

Mosque of Córdoba
Spain

Kata Tjuta
Australia